A Simple Hack to Improve Your College Experience: Get Involved!

Brite with her two Collegiate Health Service Corps site volunteers, Radha (middle) and Mehak (right).
Brite with her two Collegiate Health Service Corps site volunteers, Radha (middle) and Mehak (right).

College is the land of opportunity. Although everyone who attends has the same goal of walking away with a degree, academics are only a small portion of the experience. There are over 300 student-run extracurriculars you can choose from, including Undergraduate Philosophy Society, 3D Printing Club, and even UConn Kendo, a Japanese sport that uses bamboo swords to spar. It’s not difficult to discover new interests and find your own niche.

I began my college career trying out different activities. For me, getting involved with Community Outreach has been a very life-changing experience. It is a student-run volunteer organization that coordinates various programs to work with local underserved populations. Some are one-time or weekend service events, while others are semester-long programs that fall under one of the three categories: youth development and education, health, and language learning and literacy. I am currently a site leader for Collegiate Health Service Corps (CHSC) and Windham Hospital Volunteer Program. Out of the two, CHSC has impacted me the most. Every semester, teams of three are assigned to specific local populations to teach health topics to, where each team has the freedom to design their own lesson plans and incorporate interactive activities. Continue reading

Tips to a Fulfilling Summer

Mindy reading a book while overlooking the quad.
Mindy reading a book while overlooking the quad.

With summer rapidly approaching everyone cannot wait for the school year to end and the relaxing to begin. However, having a fulfilling summer is key when looking back on it once the school year restarts. There is no greater sense of accomplishment when you are cooped up in your dorm room, then to know there isn’t anything else you wish you had done this past summer.

Here are some tips for how to have a fulfilling summer:

 

Read a good book: Being in college a lot of the books we read are in the form of a textbook or based on something we are not interested in at all. A book that you actually enjoy can help stimulate imagination and create focus and concentration. Often time in the summer people are either constantly doing activities or not doing anything at all. It is important to keep your brain working, so why not do it with a book you like. Books related to your passion or field of study can also help you recreate or improve yourself in various aspects. For example, you could be inspired to do one act of kindness a day or discover a new interest of yours within your field of study. Continue reading

Floods and Massive Landslides in Peru

Recent landslide in Peru
Recent landslide in Peru (“Flooding in Peru.” AvaxNews. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2017.)

During the month of March, prolonged rainfall has caused severe river flooding, landslides and mud flows across Peru. Around 150,000 homes, including a lot of people’s businesses have been flooded. Approximately 1,250 schools and 340 health centers have suffered some type of damage. 24 of Peru’s 25 regions have reported damage, the most affected regions are: Lima, Piura, Lambayeque, Ica, Arequipa, Huancavelica, Ancash and Loreto.

As of March 25th, 2017, there have been reported the death of 90 people, about 40 people are injured and more than 15 people missing, cause of this climate phenomenon named “El Niño Costero.” As of right now more than 120.000 people have either lost their family, businesses or friends, the number keeps increasing due to the continuous floods and landslides which is making people move to other parts of Peru.

Aside from people losing their homes, massive landslides and floods are causing the loss of water.

Police trying to move people to a safer place
Police trying to move people to a safer place (“Flooding in Peru.” AvaxNews. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2017.)

Many Peruvians do not have access to water, some have to buy water from other people and the prices are very high. Unfortunately, many people do not have the money and resources to buy water. The loss of water is not only happening in the poorest regions of Peru, many of the districts of the capital have reported that they do not have access to water, some temporarily and others for a very long period of time.

Currently, Peru has been declared in state of emergency and the situation over there is not getting any better. Many companies have been helping people find shelters and places where they can stay and be helped but the number of affected people keeps increasing. There have been a few fundraisers here in the U.S. and even at UConn to help the victims of this chaotic situation.  Recently, Continue reading

Tips for Picking the Perfect College Pet!

Danny in front of fishThere’s no argument that the number one thing all college kids absolutely love is animals. There’s nothing like flock of students who sprint to pet a newly discovered dog on campus. Often students think about getting a pet of their own for companionship and stress relief. In some cases, these decisions turn into great human-pet relationships while in others a complete disaster. Having cared for and owned practically every available pet in the book here’s some advice on getting a new companion during your college career.

Firstly, you should note that the on-campus housing limits you to nothing besides a fish tank less than 30 gallons total per room (10 gallons per person). Off campus housing is much more ideal for keeping pets.  Be sure to check with your landlord for their pet policies and if there are extra required costs before getting a new companion.

Fish: A+ College Rating

My 10 Gallon "UConn" Fish Tank.
My 10 Gallon “UConn” Fish Tank.

I always like to start with fish because they’re one of my favorites groups of animals and often underrated. Not only are there a wide variety of species, colors, and temperaments but many are relatively easy to care for. One of the greatest things about fish is that they are always inside an aquarium. Unlike other animals, like snakes, fish generally stay inside the tank and you won’t have to worry about one frolicking through your dorm or apartment building if they get out!

Fish are an ideal choice of pet in college and a great stress reliever. Watching fish tanks has been proven to lower stress levels and relax people with anxiety. Entire fish tanks can be set up for under $100 and require low maintenance. Small 10 gallon kits are available at local pet stores and are great for easy to keep bettas, tetras, guppies, and other small freshwater community fish. If you are more interested in Continue reading

Travel Tips for College Students

Performing an annual exam on a jaguar with the veterinary medical team from my Honduras spring break trip.
Performing an annual exam on a jaguar with the veterinary medical team from my Honduras spring break trip.

Many college students are advised to travel at some point during their undergraduate career. Whether it be a study abroad program, a community service trip, or a vacation with close friends, I believe that traveling in any capacity can broaden your perspective and teach you things that you may not get the chance to experience during your time at school. At an age when many of us don’t have our lives quite figured out yet, the experiences I’ve had traveling have provided me opportunities to gain confidence and independence, learn self-reflection, and ultimately be more aware of what is going on in the world around me. Unfortunately, travel is sometimes difficult for students due to limited budgets, busy schedules, or other circumstances, but it is definitely still possible! Here are some tips and advice about traveling as a student that I’ve picked up in my travels thus far:

 

  1. Take advantage of study abroad programs and educational opportunities abroad.

I urge any student to look into what their school’s study abroad programs have to offer. These trips are designed for students and are many times more cost effective or easier to schedule while you’re going to school. If a whole semester is difficult to commit to for scheduling or money reasons, consider programs that run during school breaks. Last May I went on a 3 week study abroad trip to South Africa and it was cheaper than going for a semester as well as allowing me to work around the classes that I’m required to take. In addition to college-run programs, there are plenty of Continue reading

Starting College in a Living Learning Community

To some, the first few days of college are overwhelming and lonely because they struggle to find common ground with the people around them. However, if you’re lucky enough to come into UConn in a Living Learning Community (LLC) such as the Women in Math, Science, and Engineering (WiMSE) learning community, then that adjustment is really already made for you. Living Learning Communities are groups of students that live together based on a common application into that program. For example, there’s WiMSE, Business Connections, Engineering, Innovations, Scholars, EcoHouse, and many more.

WiMSE is a group of women in STEM disciplines. I have lived in the community for two years in various residence halls.  First WiMSE was located in the Watson building of the Alumni residence area, and it has since moved to the NextGeneration Connecticut residence hall.  The group of girls has changed from year to year, but I am still particularly close with the now sophomores of WiMSE. The best part of WiMSE is the mutual understanding between everyone. We all are familiar with the very challenging classes that accompany a STEM major, and find fellowship in the stress of attempting to be accepted into graduate school. WiMSE has given me my best friend, a wonderful position in undergraduate research, many personal and professional connections, as well as Continue reading

Meeting New People in a Stress Relieving Environment

SHAMEE RANG Showcase at Rutgers University
SHAMEE RANG Showcase at Rutgers University

Like most incoming freshmen students, finding a hobby or passion in college is always a struggle in the beginning. Trying to balance your schedule, choosing the required classes, and finding time to study or exercise can be very stressful. As a commuting freshman, it was hard to find a place on campus to let myself go and do something I loved, especially when I did not know anyone coming to UConn. College can make or break you, as preparation for making life choices and becoming independent. For me, my first year in college was tough because I struggled to find an efficient method to study for classes such as Biology 1107, while seeking a place to de-stress. Despite struggling to excel in school during my freshman year, eventually I figured out how to balance my schoolwork, working three jobs at one point, and making time to hang out with friends. Unfortunately, it wasn’t easy because I was always stressed about school. Luckily, I took a chance last semester and went to the Fall Involvement Fair, and found an Asian Fusion Acapella group with members who Continue reading

The Transition Nobody Warns You About

When I was in high school, I always had this preconceived idea of what college is supposed to look like, and how it is supposed to be the best four years of your life. That’s why I eagerly applied to schools all outside of New York, with the hopes of meeting new people, discovering myself, achieving success, and being independent. Now as I am halfway through the second semester of my sophomore year, I can proudly say I have accomplished these dreams of mine, but it did not come as easily as I thought it would or should.

Brittany with members of her sorority helping new girls go through Panhellenic recruitment for Fall 2016.
Brittany with members of her sorority helping new girls go through Panhellenic recruitment for Fall 2016.

Before I left for college, I spent 18 years of my life living in the same town as my entire family; this includes my mom’s twelve brothers and sisters and all of my fifty something cousins (yeah I know crazy right?). I was used to seeing my family almost every day, hanging out with my friends who I have known since we were in diapers, and spending much of my free time going to the mall, the beach, the city, or other places where I was constantly surrounded by other people and loud noises. I had received all A’s in my classes while managing to work five days a week and participating in various clubs and extracurricular activities. I thought I really had my life together, and I was expecting to be able to just continue what I was doing in college with ease.

Nobody ever warned me how difficult the transition from high school into college can be for some people. I walked into UConn without knowing anyone, and I remember how scared and lonely I felt those first few weeks. I remember looking at my home friends’ social media accounts and Continue reading

The Leap to Adulthood: Tips to Being Successful

Tulsi's roommates and friends celebrating Friendsgiving
Tulsi’s roommates and friends celebrating Friendsgiving

Often we think of turning 21 as the big step to adulthood, however, there is a key element which is vital to becoming an adult: being able to take care of yourself. Freshman year it is typical that people move into a one room dorm with a meal plan. However, at some point, there are no options for dorms and no pre-made food there for you to eat whenever you want. That is the true leap to adulthood, when you move into an apartment and have to cook and clean for yourself.

Taking care of yourself seems pretty straight forward, you’ve been doing it all your life. But what about when it’s just you, a student with minimal income and no time for anything except studying and Netflix? As one of the many students who has taken this step, here are some things that I’ve learned in my first year living in an apartment:

  1. Food Budget: With a part-time job only providing a small income, it is EXTREMELY important to budget. I plan out my dinners weekly so I can have efficient shopping trips and keep myself from buying extra food. It is also important to factor in other costs such as buying coffees or going out to eat, as it can add up pretty fast.
  2. Cleaning Schedule: Living with roommates can be difficult, but sharing an apartment with multiple people can be even more frustrating. It is important to set up a schedule for cleaning everything from pots and pans to taking out the trash. You should remember that people grew up with different habits, so you should all be on the same page about how to keep things tidy.
  3. Enjoy yourself! Having my own room in college for the first time has reminded me of how great it is to hang out alone. Me time is always a good idea, it gives you time to de-stress and enjoy your hobbies. As usual, its important to manage your time between school work and you time.
  4. Stay social. Living in an apartment is cozy and can lead to becoming anti-social after discovering how great it is to have your own space. Make sure to still get out there and see people, whether its cooking with your roommates or going out to a basketball game with friends. I can say that I have learned so much from my roommates this year, its been great learning about their cultures and experiencing their food.
  5. Make it your own. Have fun decorating your apartment! I spent a lot of time on Pinterest finding things I wanted to make. DIY is the cheapest option when on a budget, as well as yard sales if you’re looking for furniture. Make your apartment an expression of who you are and enjoy doing it with by making things with friends and family.

Continue reading

My First FNCE: Learning about the Field of Nutrition and Dietetics

Me and my nutrition friends pose for a photo at FNCE 2016.
Me and my nutrition friends pose for a photo at FNCE 2016.

In the Fall of 2016, I began my journey to become a Registered Dietitian (RD) in the Coordinated Program in Dietetics. It was a busy semester—a full course-load plus my introduction to supervised clinical practice in a long-term care facility. As the semester kicked into gear with exams and projects, I—like many students—put all my focus into simply studying and getting good grades.

In October, all of the students in my program were encouraged to attend the Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo (FNCE) in Boston. It was a treat that the conference that draws nutrition professionals from across the country was going to be held so close to UConn. As the conference approached, we all worried about the time taken out of our studies. When were we going to study for that microbiology exam? When is that lab report going to get done?

On the first day of the conference, I watched the President of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics speak.  She spoke of how far the field of dietetics has come since its advent, and the importance of the work that dietitians do.  It struck me how proud I was to be entering a field dedicated to helping people become healthier in diverse ways— Continue reading