Don’t Be Scared To Fail, Embrace It ‘Til You Succeed

By Matthew Barrios

As far back as I can remember, all I knew was that I had to push myself always to be the best. Not for myself, nor my friends or loved ones, but for my parents. Even though it may sound like a cliche, my parents have always been my heroes. They were immigrants who came to this country with nothing more than a 6th-grade education, an identification that only worked in Guatemala, and fifty dollars in their pockets. Since then, both of them were able to groom four children: my older sister (who is now a fully registered nurse in one of the best hospitals in New England), my 17-year-old little brother (who is already in line to get scouted by colleges), and my 12-year-old sister (who is becoming a prodigy in gymnastics). Lastly, there is me: the first child to ever move away from home, live at a major state university, and gain a spot in one of their most competitive majors on record. All of us wish to make our parents and loved ones proud, but one thing I learned while attending UConn was that I was scared to fail.

Becoming a part of the class of 2022 at UConn Storrs was a whole game changer. High school was too comfortable for me. UConn challenged me to jump out of my comfort zone. It was a bumpy transition into the common college student life, but eventually I got the hang of it. Still. I had this lingering fear of failing. Every semester got more challenging. Every class got more difficult and kept asking more of me bit by bit. Every night kept getting shorter, I started to run out of time to study and began to miss assignments. Freshman year, I wasn’t that scared because I had enough time on my hands that I could take multiple jobs and still get outstanding grades in my classes, yet it was always that fear of failing that kept crawling up my neck and taking over my body slowly, like a virus. One thing that I learned from attending UConn for the past two and a half years is that you shouldn’t be scared to fail.

Failure teaches you where your errors happened and how you can become better next time. Failure shouldn’t be our worst enemy; rather, it should be our teacher. Our teacher tells us to always pick ourselves up and prepare to tackle the problems ahead. We always mistake failure for the end, when in reality it’s giving up that takes away our second chance. We may fall, but that doesn’t necessarily mean we’re down for the count. There is still time to get back up and reach the finish line or score that goal or knock out that last study session to ace the final.

The most important lesson that I have learned, and am still currently learning, is that it’s okay to fail. It’s okay to get an unpleasant grade because, at the end of the day, it fuels your motivation for a second chance to correct it. A soccer player doesn’t get better by just practicing one free-kick; they get better by constantly missing until they finally find the right angle to make a goal 10/10 times. Because of failure, I am now within my third year of the four-year Landscape Architecture program with a promising internship while holding employment as a student tour guide at the Lodewick Visitor Center on campus as well as a Club Sports manager for one of my favorite sports, soccer. The university offers so many opportunities to discover who you wish to be or possibly become. I found myself more comfortable at one of the five culture centers on campus, the Puerto Rican Latin American Culture Center. There I became part of a community that later became my home away from home along with some other groups that gave me memories that I will never forget.