ARE: My Major and Me

By Jigar Kapadia

Ever since I enrolled at UConn, balance has been one of my biggest mantras. Finding it has allowed me to experience a wide variety of opportunities, from networking with UConn alumni to embarking on field trips with UConn’s Wildlife Society. Likewise, I wanted my degree to to prepare me for the diverse array of situations the future will have in store. That is why I majored in Applied and Resource Economics or ARE for short. Majoring in ARE has prepared me to think analytically about problems in production, marketing and management within business firms through examples in natural resources and agriculture industries. The program grants a Bachelor of Science degree, and offers three main concentrations. I have taken courses that apply to each of the three, and all have enabled me to develop highly advantageous skills that I can carry forward into my professional life.

Business Management and Marketing will especially suit those interested in business. One course I took within this area, Computational Analysis in Applied Economics (ARE 3333), laid the foundation for me to analyze agricultural business problems and management decisions through Excel. Because of the course, I now know how to create formulas that minimize the amount of actual work needed in setting up a spreadsheet and get the necessary data I need faster. This skill in Microsoft Office and similar programs is key for communicating a presentation or data entries within a business environment. On top of this, the courses in the concentration help establish a strong understanding of consumer choices as well as profit and risk management, while also explaining how factors such as law and government policies have an impact on agricultural business decisions.

Environmental Economics and Policy is great if you are interested in legislation and the state of natural resources. This is especially true for Environmental and Resource Policy (ARE 3434), which lays out the history and procedures surrounding important environmental and natural resource issues like environmental quality, energy use, natural resource management, and valuation of natural resources. This information gave me a strong understanding how policies are crafted within the United States and provided an important context to answering these same issues in the future if I am part of a government agency or private business that provides services in sustainability, environmental, or natural resource areas.

The Developmental Economics and Policy concentration seeks to address issues like world hunger and poverty both domestically and internationally. I gained a better understanding about how national and international agricultural analysis is conducted in Food Policy (ARE 3260), while in Economic Geography (GEOG 2100), I was given a thorough overview of issues such as transportation and allocation of resources at the local, regional and global economic level. Both gave me the chance to apply techniques such as cost-benefit analysis and risk investment decision-making, which is key for careers in governmental policymaking as well as international organizations such as the World Bank and Save the Children.

ARE also offers 3 minors, including Business Management and Marketing along with Environmental Economics and Policy. The third option is Equine Business Management, which provides an overview of marketing, management, and financial principles in equine management. On top of this, there are opportunities to receive credit for approved internships and projects, which allows you to apply the knowledge from coursework to the real world. I had the chance to do so in the Farm Credit East Fellows Program through the Professional Internship Course (ARE 4991). Even though my experience was cut short due to the pandemic, it still provided an insightful opportunity into how a lending financial services provider such as Farm Credit East serves agriculture and natural resource-based businesses. Assignments given throughout the course simulated the tasks done daily within the firm, including determining the creditworthiness of borrowers, analyzing a company’s probability of defaulting, and evaluating real estate property value.

Thanks to the programs offered in Applied and Resource Economics, I have been able to balance my efforts into a specific set of skills and experiences that suit me best. Now I know how to be both analytical and constructive when it comes to information thanks to Business Management and Marketing. My time in Environmental Economics has made me more aware of how our natural resources are managed and maintained to suit our needs, and Development Economics and Policy has given me a better understanding of how logistical decisions are made here in America and abroad. These approaches, accompanied by hands-on internship experience, have set me up for a well-balanced career path as I look ahead to the world beyond college.