Other

A Foreign Perspective on College

Singapore
Singapore

The idea of “home” has always been an ambiguous term for me. Before arriving at UConn, I had lived in four different countries, attended five different schools, and was basically always on the move. The thought of making yet another move to college did not intimidate me in the slightest, which in hindsight, was extremely naïve of me. As every high school student does, I had a preconceived notion of what college should be like, and some may say, very unrealistic expectations of what the next four years of my life were going to look like.

I made the move to America alone, with my family being 10,000 miles away in Singapore, and suddenly it all hit me. I didn’t know a single person in this country, I hadn’t decided on my major, and I most importantly, I didn’t have any winter clothes for the upcoming frost.

First Winter in the US
First Winter in the US

Although the first few weeks were without a doubt miserable, I slowly started to find myself, and I realized that the “college experience” doesn’t just happen on its own, it is something you have to build for yourself. It became very clear that putting myself out there and talking to as many strangers as I could was a necessity if I was ever going to meet people that I liked. I realized that I had very little interest in any of my Economics classes (the major that I had intended on pursuing), but rather that I was truly passionate about the Environmental courses that I was enrolled in. Being on my own helped me discover my passions and helped me figure out what kind of people that I want to surround myself with.

College is what you make of it. As cheesy at it sounds, I have found this to be the most accurate representation of my past two years here at UConn. Put yourself out there, meet as many people as you can, and take as wide a variety of classes as you possibly can, because there is no way of knowing what you’re truly passionate about if you do not let yourself explore the options.