Student Employment

Working at the UConn Horse Barn

By Julia Brower

My entire life I have loved horses. In fact, when I was a kid, my mom used to tell me that there were no horses in Connecticut, hoping that it was just a phase. It was not just a phase, and I eventually called her bluff. When I turned eight years old, I had my first riding lesson on a big chestnut horse named Jackson and have continued riding ever since. At home, I get to ride at least two to three horses every time I go. Their names are Venus, Roxy, and Otis, and they are all fun in their own way.

When it finally became time to embark on my journey at UConn, I continued my horseback riding lessons in order to provide a comfort zone that could make the university feel a bit smaller. Since I was only a freshman, I decided to wait until I had gotten used to the college lifestyle before finding an on-campus job. Being an animal science major on the pre-vet track, I was worried about struggling in the hard classes that were soon to come. When sophomore year came along, however, a job opened up at the horse barns, just as I felt ready to become more involved on campus. I was already in the barn a lot, considering that I took lessons and had just started an independent study with a horse named Slick that I rode and worked with every day on my own time. (Now that horse has actually been sold and is doing really well!) That October, I started my first day as a student employee of the UConn horse barns.

Me and my friend Rachel getting hay for the truck.

Working at the horse barns can be tough. It involves a lot of hay splinters, and dust, as well as the cleaning out of fifty stalls every day, but I would not change it for a thing. The good times of this job outweighs the bad. We get to see the baby horses and even help take care of them. My favorite baby of this bunch is Ziva, who is the daughter of Zoe, a big Friesian, and she can be very feisty.

Me and Ziva

We sometimes play music while cleaning stalls and do side projects like walking polo ponies to a pasture down the road in the summer or taking pictures of horses that are for sale. Some other tasks are not as exhausting; for example, we sometimes hand walk some of the injured horses or groom the ones that we are going to breed.

Abigail Rose as a newborn.

Ever since my first day, I have gained so much knowledge that I never thought I would get as a student worker. I’ve made some new friends, gained the trust of my bosses, and was able to observe and assist the veterinarian and farrier. Because I am an animal science major, these opportunities at my job are extremely helpful because I would not have had the same experiences if I had simply chosen a typical student job, like working in the dining hall, just for money or involvement. Being here, I have gained some leadership skills by being one of the more experienced workers, as well as public speaking skills in having to talk to visitors. While some jobs may be stressful, working and being at the barn is actually my stress reliever because I can just go into a stall and pet a horse whenever I want. In working at the UConn horse barn, I am forever grateful for the opportunities that I have gotten and the ones to come. Being a part of something so meaningful to me in college is wonderful, and I suggest to any new students that you seek that place or job that you enjoy and can relieve the stress of academic life.